L.L Griffin is the director at  Catspaw Productions Inc,  where they are committed to helping people find Pause. With yoga, art and find pause.  She teaches yoga – Catspaw Yoga and at Catspaw Cushions where they manufacture meditation, yoga and home accessories. Griffin continues to work on art projects.

Exhibitions:
clouds

exhibited at Walker Fine Art Gallery in Denver, Colorado.

I began to photograph clouds with no landscape.  I knew I could not take my camera everywhere, and even when I had it with me, I could not stop everywhere.  I know I have missed some very beautiful clouds and light.  Once, I was biking in Utah with out a camera, when I saw a cloud morph into a shape of a caterpillar. It is sometimes hard to remember that the experience is more important than capturing it.

Inside the Belly of the Whale

Griffin received a grant from the Rocky Mountain Women’s Institute, for Inside the Belly of the Whale. The Denver Art Museum has acquired four of her prints from Inside the Belly of the Whale (The Blue Dream series). The work was displayed for the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center conference on the Quandaries in Health Care: Illness and Culture in the Postmodern Age at the Given Institute in Aspen, Colorado.

Something that a Cowboy Knows

The book Something that a Cowboy Knows was published by Utah State University Press with a forward by Teresa Jordan.   The exhibit Something that a Cowboy Knows first appeared at the Arvada Center and the Colorado Historical Society. The exhibition traveled throughout the west and is now part of the permanent collection of the Western Folklife Center in Elko, Nevada.

Looking for Heart (prequel to Inside the Belly of the Whale)

exhibited at Berkley Park Gallery – Betty Arca, Denver Colorado.

Griffin’s work has appeared in the New York Times, MS Magazine, Woman’s Day, Der Spiegel, Men’s Journal, trade publications, the Denver Business Journal, newspapers, book jackets, CD covers, and Communication Arts Photography Annual. Her photograph assignments are now limited to personal commissions.

clouds

Some people need to seek the world; to go out and explore. Others seem to let the world come to them. I have become the later – a little by choice and a little by circumstance.

I am very much in transition in my personal life. I felt that creatively, I had to have access to something that was not too complicated; something in my own backyard. Clouds seemed so obvious and available. So I began photography clouds with no landscape. I knew I could not take my camera everywhere, and even when I had it with me, I could not stop everywhere. I know I have missed some very beautiful clouds and light. Once, I was biking in Utah with out a camera, when I saw a cloud morph into a shape of a caterpillar. It is sometimes hard to remember that the experience is more important than capturing it.

When I look up and watch the clouds it is like watching a dream, in which change flows so effortlessly. Clouds represent a changeless routine and transition, transformation or maybe even evolution. Ralph Waldo Emerson said “nature is a mutable cloud, always and never the same.” It is interesting to watch clouds change daily and moment-by-moment. They are not always what you think you saw, or the experience that you thought you had.

Having the privilege to contemplate the clouds is certainly a gift to yourself of time and space. Emerson also said “the sky is the daily bread for the eyes.” I want my kids to take the time to look up at the sky and ponder.

looking for heart

When I first created these images, they were work prints made as I processed, mentally and emotionally, the feelings that would later become a different body of work, Inside the Belly of the Whale.

After making these prints I put them away and completed Inside the Belly of the Whale. But when I recently came across these working images, they gave me pause to think about what they meant then and what they mean now.

I believe, like many, that we are all on a journey. Part of that journey is being responsible for what we create as we struggle to heal. We are looking for what is real, who we are, what we want, and above all, we are Looking for Heart.

Something that a Cowboy Knows, published by Utah State University Press. was a traveling exhibit, which first showed at the Arvada Center, Arvada Colorado and is part of permanent collection at the Western Folklife Center in Elko, Nevada